No, Most Black Kids Are Not Fatherless

Amid the debates raging now over racism in America, there’s a myth rearing its ugly head. It’s one I’ve been fighting to end, and one that all those of us committed to both racial and gender equality should learn about.

The myth is that most black fathers are absent from their homes — or that most black children grow up without their fathers. Both of these claims are false.

Still, the myth shows up in tweets carrying misleading statistics, often from people blaming fatherlessness for numerous problems facing the black community. It also comes from officials, such as Dallas police chief David Brown who said, “70% of the African American community is raised by single women.”

For my book, All In, I set out to show the truths about today’s dads. That included devoting a chapter specifically to the myths about African-American fathers. Here are just a couple of the facts:

Most black fathers live with their children. There are about 2.5 million who live with their children, and 1.7 million who don’t, according to the CDC.
Black dads who live with their children are actually the most involved fathers of all, on average, a CDC study found.

The lead researcher told me the study I report on in the book marks “the debunking of the black-fathers-being-absent myth.”

But why do other statistics, such as what Brown said, paint such a different and more dire picture?

Brown referred to “single women.” This means unmarried. Having unmarried parents does not make a child fatherless. Some unmarried couples live and raise children together.

Many studies of fatherlessness also mistakenly use housing as their sole determinant. This is why fatherlessness statistics in general are inflated. Many children of divorced parents don’t share a legal address with their fathers but still see their fathers often. They’re not fatherless.

For more on this, watch my interview on NewsOne. Or to see what even The White House and President Barack Obama have gotten wrong, see the Provost’s Lecture I gave at Stony Brook University, below. (This section is 45 minutes in.)

Fatherlessness is still a bigger problem statistically in the black community than it is among other racial groups. Some kids who don’t live with their dads really are fatherless. And when I examined Census reports about black children, I found that slightly more than half don’t have the same legal residence as their fathers.

Yes, I know, this seems confusing at first.

Some fathers have died, at times killed in violence for example, so they’re obviously not included in studies that look at fathers. And some men of any race become what I call “serial impregnators,” having lots of children without raising them — more children than the good dads do. This helps explain the very different statistic.

One such man has a chapter in my book, explaining why he ignored his six children until finally realizing the error of his ways.

Tackling fatherlessness certainly requires change among men, including the minority of black men, who are choosing to shirk their responsibilities. And when it comes to the black community specifically, tackling fatherlessness also requires ending structural forces of racism.

For example, disproportionate incarceration of black men for similar offenses puts dads in jail, leaving fatherless children who are more likely to face all sorts of problems in the future, including criminal behavior. (For the book I spent time at a jail interviewing dads who are enrolled in a program to turn their lives around.)

Moving in the right direction begins with understanding the reality. Most black children are not fatherless. And most black dads are setting a great example.

A version of this column previously appeared at onthemarc.org, the website of Men Advocating Real Change. — This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
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For Every Mother Who Has Lost Her Child

I miss you more than words could ever speak or essays could ever express.

I hurt more than a human body and soul should ever be able to endure in this life.

There may be no greater pain in this world than losing you; an unbearable pain I would not wish on anymore, a pain that no one can begin to fathom.

But until we are reunited again one day…

Rest easy, my Precious One, in the safe arms of Jesus, who will protect you until one day I can.

Shine bright, Baby, as you are now amongst the stars in the brilliant sky above.

Fly, my Sweet One, fly as high as Heaven’s gates will allow your perfect soul to reach.

Think of me often, my Child, and know that with each beat of my heart I am yearning for you.

Soar high, my Love, on angels’ wings, up and over the mountain tops of Paradise.

Until we meet again…
Until you are in Mommy’s arms…
Until my heart hurts no more…

Know that as long as I have breath in my body, I love you, I miss you, I yearn for you, I need you, my Precious Love.

So fly high, my Child, until that glorious day that I will hold you in my arms, and never again shall we be separated.

You can follow Long at The Real Deal of Parenting — This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
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Civil Unrest Is America's Problem

Co-authored by Harmony Hobbs, Huffington Post contributor

We know what you’re thinking: what do two white women from the deep South know about race that I don’t? What could they possibly tell me that I don’t already know?

It turns out, we can tell you a lot.

We live in Baton Rouge. The city that you are currently seeing every time you open your Facebook feed or watch television with your family. This is the city that the rest of the nation has watched for the last two weeks and collectively made the statement that this kind of stuff doesn’t happen in other parts of the country.

But it does.

Before we started to write this, we went looking for statistics on our country as a whole. According to the latest Hate Crime Statistics available from the FBI, 47 percent of all hate crimes nationally are racially motivated. This is happening in all areas of the country, not just the deep South.

We both send our children to public school in Baton Rouge, an act that causes people to gasp when they find this out because most white families within the city limits send their children to private or parochial school. Our children go to school in diverse environments, which includes every race that lives within our state. We seek out diversity, and many have asked ‘why’. Many white citizens of Baton Rouge believe that white privilege is only for affluent families, that it is not applicable to all members of their race. They mistakenly believe that they are excluded from this category because they are not wealthy, when in reality, it applies to all white people because simply being born into white skin is considered a privilege. Many white individuals in Baton Rouge believe  that diversity is not their problem, a sentiment reflected in much of America.

But it is.

Our children will go off into the world whether we like it or not and they will not constantly be surrounded their own race. Our job as mothers, fathers, and parents, is to be their first teacher and their first leader educating them on privilege and race relations. It is a common misconception that privilege means wealth when, in fact, it means you have the good fortune of being born with a certain color of skin or gender.

White parents, in particular, carry the burden of responsibility in changing the perceptions of the next generation. We need to teach our children to listen to other perspectives and revel in our differences. We need to quit claiming to be colorblind, when instead, we should embrace the differences, see other races and appreciate the diversity that they bring to different communities.

Just like teaching our children proactively about right and wrong, sex education, responsible alcohol consumption, we must proactively teach them about privilege and race.

We are currently repeating the mistakes in history from fifty years ago. Are we really going to let our children make the same mistakes fifty years from now? Just because it is uncomfortable to have the conversation?

Our answer is no.

Ask your children what they know about other races. Ask if them if they have any questions about the history lessons they are learning in school. We have both asked our children in the last few days if they had any questions about what was happening in Baton Rouge. It turns out, they did. Our sons asked why was this happening, why do people think we are fighting because of our skin color? Why is Baton Rouge on the news? The important thing for us to do as mothers right now is to listen to what they are asking. They don’t know what the right answer is, they are just looking to understand.

Children absorb more than we give them credit for. In our experience, it is best to face these questions head on. Tell them, in age appropriate terms, what is happening, that there are good and bad people in every race and every walk of life. In a child’s world full of fairy tales and superheroes, they understand the struggle between good and evil.

These conversations are uncomfortable. We know because we have them, and we have them often. Many times, we have to seek out the knowledge of others standing on the opposite side to fully understand our collective ground. We want to understand, and more often than not, they want to understand, too. This means humbly asking your black friends how to become an ally. Call your black friends and ask them how do they see the current events? How do people view them?

In light of all the horrific occurrences happening right now because of a few hateful individuals, we implore you to take the opportunity to talk to your kids about race.

Talk to them before someone else does.

*this originally ran as a guest post on Housewife Plus on the Bangor Daily News — This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
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17 Times Twitter Totally Understood The Plight Of The Short Man

For reasons that go back millennia, height is important. Tall men get paid more than shorter men; even tall-looking faces are perceived as being more masculine.
But what is tall, anyway? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 2007-2010 the average height for men in the U.S. was 69.3 inches ― 5 feet 8 inches. And anyway, height is nothing to be proud or ashamed of. It’s simply your biology.
Still, it just seems like the world was built for taller dudes. You go into the bathroom, all the urinals are too high. You try to buy some shorts, and they’re either too tight or too long. And why do women just want to talk about your height all day?
You know who’s 5’8” (give or take an inch)? Tom Cruise, Mark Wahlberg, Usher, Justin Bieber and Tom Hardy. Heck, Daniel Radcliffe is 5’5”. But those are just the famous guys.
Men who aren’t famous, especially those on Twitter, know what it’s like to be of average height, just trying to get by in a world built for giants.

#ShortGuyProblems pic.twitter.com/QUD3SWzmJM— Kristopher with a K (@KristopurrH) May 26, 2016

"I'm all the way up" – Official Song of My Car's Driver Seat#ShortGuyProblems— Chris Millhouse (@ChrisMillhouse) May 13, 2016

When I go get my haircut, the hair stylist still puts me in a booster seat… #ShortGuyProblems— Jared Mews (@JaredMews) January 5, 2016

#sotrue #shortmenissues #shortmenproblems pic.twitter.com/XO6G9ZQO0v— logan (@LoganMacoy) December 4, 2014

Getting elbows to the face @_plain_patty_ #shortmenproblems— Garrison France (@FancyFrance22) July 8, 2012

Just found out my dad wore heels for his wedding all those years ago #shortmenproblems— Keafan Portbury (@keaf05) January 5, 2014

Can't do a medium because its too tight. But can't do a large because its too long. #ShortMenProblems— Dewitt Zepu (@DewittZepu) December 8, 2012

it is so hard for me when tall people are younger, because i feel younger just in size and its weird #shortguyproblems— Johannus Steger (@AuthorSteger) July 11, 2016

Tried to use the big boy urinal. Shit splashed back on me. #ShortMenProblems— LittleBigMan (@ArielHurts1) November 29, 2011

Don't know why my wife insists on putting my food goodies on the top shelf of our stores where I can't reach. #shortguyproblems— Simon Wood (@simonwoodwrites) June 23, 2016

#DoubleStandards #shortguyproblems #retweet pic.twitter.com/tqBWvFcihi— EDHER MANUELLE (@edhermanuelle) April 24, 2016

Perks of dating me: If you don't like using high heels you don't have to #shortguyproblems— Diego Valdes (@diegovtheone) June 26, 2016

In this world women like large men and small dogs its the opposite of the ideal situation for me #shortguyproblems— Dave Catania (@greatheights65) June 29, 2016

They should make black staples for those last minute hem jobs. #shortguyproblems #weddings #— barrett james (@barrett__james) July 2, 2016

Constantly being asked how old you are in public cause you look like a HS Junior #ShortGuyProblems #YoungFaceProblems— Ugly Disciple™ (@Uber_nowhere) May 11, 2016

#ShortGuyProblems In the club when she realises she's been grinding against your stomach cause you're so short. pic.twitter.com/grxJQjDK1P— Mpanza (@Sibu_MpanzaSA) May 10, 2016

Me asf lol. Only 5'8" #shortguyproblems pic.twitter.com/ZBo39fMjaK— Ricardo Gonzalez (@r_gonzvlez) April 15, 2016

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
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19 Times Twitter Totally Understood The Plight Of The Short Man

For reasons that go back millennia, height is important. Tall men get paid more than shorter men; even tall-looking faces are perceived as being more masculine.
But what is tall, anyway? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 2007-2010 the average height for men in the U.S. was 69.3 inches ― 5 feet 8 inches. And anyway, height is nothing to be proud or ashamed of. It’s simply your biology.
Still, it just seems like the world was built for taller dudes. You go into the bathroom, all the urinals are too high. You try to buy some shorts, and they’re either too tight or too long. And why do women just want to talk about your height all day?
You know who’s 5’8” (give or take an inch)? Tom Cruise, Mark Wahlberg, Usher, Justin Bieber and Tom Hardy. Heck, Daniel Radcliffe is 5’5”. But those are just the famous guys.
Men who aren’t famous, especially those on Twitter, know what it’s like to be of average height, just trying to get by in a world built for giants.

#ShortGuyProblems pic.twitter.com/QUD3SWzmJM— Kristopher with a K (@KristopurrH) May 26, 2016

"I'm all the way up" – Official Song of My Car's Driver Seat#ShortGuyProblems— Chris Millhouse (@ChrisMillhouse) May 13, 2016

When I go get my haircut, the hair stylist still puts me in a booster seat… #ShortGuyProblems— Jared Mews (@JaredMews) January 5, 2016

#sotrue #shortmenissues #shortmenproblems pic.twitter.com/XO6G9ZQO0v— logan (@LoganMacoy) December 4, 2014

Getting elbows to the face @_plain_patty_ #shortmenproblems— Garrison France (@FancyFrance22) July 8, 2012

Just found out my dad wore heels for his wedding all those years ago #shortmenproblems— Keafan Portbury (@keaf05) January 5, 2014

Can't do a medium because its too tight. But can't do a large because its too long. #ShortMenProblems— Dewitt Zepu (@DewittZepu) December 8, 2012

it is so hard for me when tall people are younger, because i feel younger just in size and its weird #shortguyproblems— Johannus Steger (@AuthorSteger) July 11, 2016

Tried to use the big boy urinal. Shit splashed back on me. #ShortMenProblems— LittleBigMan (@ArielHurts1) November 29, 2011

Don't know why my wife insists on putting my food goodies on the top shelf of our stores where I can't reach. #shortguyproblems— Simon Wood (@simonwoodwrites) June 23, 2016

#DoubleStandards #shortguyproblems #retweet pic.twitter.com/tqBWvFcihi— EDHER MANUELLE (@edhermanuelle) April 24, 2016

Perks of dating me: If you don't like using high heels you don't have to #shortguyproblems— Diego Valdes (@diegovtheone) June 26, 2016

In this world women like large men and small dogs its the opposite of the ideal situation for me #shortguyproblems— Dave Catania (@greatheights65) June 29, 2016

#shortguyproblems when u need a step ladder to wash n dry the hood of ur truck. Lol pic.twitter.com/aBrpKZTVHZ— Ron Busby (@ronbobusby) January 31, 2016

They should make black staples for those last minute hem jobs. #shortguyproblems #weddings #— barrett james (@barrett__james) July 2, 2016

#ShortGuyProblems pic.twitter.com/rcw4iD62tY— John Bird (@JohnBirdMedia) April 14, 2016

Constantly being asked how old you are in public cause you look like a HS Junior #ShortGuyProblems #YoungFaceProblems— Ugly Disciple™ (@Uber_nowhere) May 11, 2016

#ShortGuyProblems In the club when she realises she's been grinding against your stomach cause you're so short. pic.twitter.com/grxJQjDK1P— Mpanza (@Sibu_MpanzaSA) May 10, 2016

Me asf lol. Only 5'8" #shortguyproblems pic.twitter.com/ZBo39fMjaK— Ricardo Gonzalez (@r_gonzvlez) April 15, 2016

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: huffingtonpost families

To the Cop Who Pulled Us Over

We were on our way to dance class when all of sudden I saw flashing lights in the rear view mirror. It was a cop pulling us over.

“Oh my God,” I said.

“What happen?” my daughter asked.

“The cops are stopping us,” I responded.

“What does that mean?” she asked.

For a moment I thought about NOT stopping. It was an unmarked car and thought maybe it’s someone goofing off and flashing their lights. But I’d rather be safe than sorry. So, I pull over at the side of the road and a police officer approached the passenger side of my car.

“Why are they stopping us?” My daughter asked. My hands were shaking and my heart was beating fast. I felt like I was gonna pee my pants. I said a prayer and told myself, “Be calm. Stay cool.”

I can’t help feeling a sense of uneasiness. The racial unrest between law enforcement and the black community continues to dominate our news feeds, with “Black Lives Matter” being the trending topic on social media sites.

I take into account that we’re in a white neighborhood, and the last thing I need is for something bad to happen with my daughter present.

I think about Philando Castile being shot to death while his girlfriend’s 4-year-old daughter Dae’Anna sat in the back seat. The recent events involving people of color being brutally murdered by cops doesn’t exactly make me feel safe.

The voice inside my head told me not to make any sudden movements. “Keep my hands on the steering wheel and do exactly as I’m told.”

The cop stood by the passenger side window with one hand on his waist. Our eyes met and he signaled for me to roll the window down. I was so nervous. I was afraid that any sudden movement would set him off.

“Why do we have to stop?” my daughter asked.

“I don’t know. We’re gonna find out,” I responded.

“I need your license and registration,” the cop said.

“Is it okay to get it from my bag?” I asked.

“Yes,” he replied.

My bag was on the passenger seat. I slowly placed my hand inside and pulled out my purse. I found my license and reached over and handed it to him. But my nerves got in the way, so I don’t bother going into the glove compartment for the registration. I figured that I’d wait for him to ask me for it again, but he didn’t.

I asked him what I did wrong and he proceeded to tell me that I had my phone in my hand while driving. Even though I wasn’t on the phone or texting at the time, he said that the “phone should never be in your hand while driving at all.”

At that moment my daughter hijacked conversation. “But sometimes I see you texting,” she blurted out.

It didn’t take long for them to develop a bond. “How old are you?” he asked.

It turned out he has a daughter the same age. Our little girls’ birthdays are a few days apart. “I’ll tell you what. If you give me a high five, I’ll let your mom go with a warning,” she told my daughter.

She give him a high five and he let us go. I look back at my daughter and she flashed me a huge smile.

Even though I remained calm, I couldn’t help feeling shaken up. The police officer was so nice. He did a great job explaining the cell phone laws, and he even made a connection with my daughter that warmed my heart.

I know there is a lot of anger and hurt in this world right now. I can only hope and pray that we reach a better tomorrow. In order to do that, it starts with all of us.

As we continued our trip to dance class, I had a conversation with my daughter about how important it is to stay calm in situations involving cops. We may not see eye to eye on everything. But I’m sure we can all agree that we want to get home safe.

To the cop who pulled us over with my daughter in the back seat, thanks for doing a good job. Thanks for not giving me a ticket.

And to my daughter, thanks for being cute. Your mouth sometimes gets you in trouble at home. But this time your nonstop talking helped me avoid getting a ticket, even though you threw me under the bus. — This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
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These Artists Turn Your Kids' Doodles Into Wearable Jewelry

Parents can now wear their hearts on their sleeves — or on their wrists or around their necks.
Tasarım Takarım, a 2-year-old Turkish jewelry company, converts children’s drawings into cufflinks, bracelets and necklaces, among other items. 

“It’s like a single moment of someone’s childhood becomes timeless,” co-founder Yasemin Erdin Tavukçu, told The Huffington Post.

When customers send Tasarım Takarım their kid’s drawing, Tavukçu and her painter, sculptor and goldsmith, Özgür Karavit, try to figure out the best way to recreate the child’s doodle.

“Every drawing is unique,” Tavukçu told HuffPost. “So their application solutions and their techniques are also unique.”

Pieces are usually hand cut from silver or gold-plated silver. Occasionally the women add laser engraving when there’s more detail involved. The process usually takes about a week and prices range from $125 to $195. 

Many of Tasarım Takarım’s pieces are given to parents as presents, but Tavukçu says that witnessing how a child responds to seeing her drawing transformed into wearable art is the true gift.

“When kids see the jewelry [they designed], they become so proud of themselves and feel very happy,” Tavukçu said. “They feel so self-confident. They really believe that their art is loved and appreciated by others.” — This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
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Olive Garden Waiter Goes Beyond Call Of Duty To Help Sick Baby

An Arkansas mom was left speechless when a waiter at Olive Garden went above and beyond to help her family during a difficult time.
On July 21, Dallas French and her family stopped at the Olive Garden on North Rodney Parham Road in Little Rock after spending a difficult day at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. French’s 4-month-old daughter Ellee tested positive for E. coli earlier this month and needed to undergo another series of tests at the hospital. 
Exhausted from the stress of her daughter’s illness, the mom was struggling to feed the baby and eat her own meal. That’s when a very special waiter stepped in to help. French shared her story and a sweet photo of the waiter with Ellee on Olive Garden’s Facebook page.

“[A]fter all that had happened that day, I was really out of it,” the mom wrote in the caption, adding that she hadn’t gotten much sleep over the past month. When the family arrived at Olive Garden, Ellee was hungry, so French tried to prepare a bottle for her, she explained. However, the mom spilled the bottle all over herself and the floor, so she prepared another one.
At that moment, their waiter offered to help. Having just brought salad and breadsticks to the table, he told French, “Here let me feed her and you eat,” the mom recalled.
“This melted all of us and this is what we need more of!” French wrote. “He fed her, I ate my salad and bread sticks and that milk on the floor got cleaned up after we left because he just understood! He didn’t even know what we had went through that day and showed us love and understanding ― not irritated that I had made a mess and my baby was screaming.”
“Gosh I wish I woulda got his name because he deserves the recognition!!” she added.
In just two days, the mom’s post received over 155,000 likes. Commenters identified the waiter in the photo as Robert Davis, and French subsequently friended him on Facebook.
French told The Huffington Post that she shared her post on Olive Garden’s Facebook page at the suggestion of friends. “Everything was such a blur that day, and I was so frazzled and mind-blocked,” she said, adding, “We just left a good tip and left, but I didn’t get to tell him how much I appreciated him doing that one act of kindness and that it changed my whole day and made what’s been going on this past month a lot lighter.”
French explained that Ellee had been sick since July 8. “She was diagnosed with a UTI and hydronephrosis (swelling of the kidney), so her kidney and tube to her urethra will be monitored,” the mom said, noting that doctors were optimistic she would recover with time.
Today, Ellee is doing very well. “You wouldn’t know anything was wrong with her now,” French said. “She is still getting back on her normal routine ― we are almost there!”
The mom hopes that the story of the waiter’s good deed will be a beacon of light in the midst of the negative events in the news lately. “I hope … that everyone will see pure love between two strangers and that is what we need more of,” she said. French said she also wants others to be inspired to do good deeds and “just be respectful of one another and appreciate life.”
“We can accept the differences between us all and still show love!” — This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
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I've Had it With My Kids Complaining That They're Bored!

Last summer I over-scheduled my kids with local camps nearly every week we weren’t visiting grandparents. By the time school started, all of us were worn out. So this year I didn’t plan a whole lot. Now all they want to do is play video games or mess around on the iPad–otherwise they’re “bored.” What happened to the days when kids played outside from morning till night? That’s how it was for my husband and me growing up. Have things changed that much, or is it just our kids?

Things have changed that much. But take heart! We don’t have to cave in the face of our children’s complaints that the only thing worth playing with has a battery or a plug. We just have to make a few adjustments–most of them, between our ears.

Children are immensely adaptable, finding ways to adjust to all kinds of circumstances when necessary. Most of us have observed that when the power goes out and they get excited about lighting candles, or when a sibling is sick and they find themselves actually capable of being gentle and kind.

In the movie, Life is Beautiful, that ability to adapt is pushed to its extreme. A father and son are held captive in a Nazi concentration camp–the most devastating fate for anyone, but soul-crushing for a parent who is forced to see his child suffering in such dire circumstances.

In the film Guido–the father–uses his imagination to shield his son Giosuè from the truth of their ghastly situation, suggesting that the camp is a very complex game in which he earns points toward winning an army tank if he carries out tasks Guido assigns to him. Boys who are quiet and hide from the guards earn extra points.

The film was heartbreaking, but it left me with a greater awareness of how powerfully we influence our children as we react to difficulties. Our kids watch us to determine how they should feel about a situation; is Daddy shaking and worried? Then I should be, too. Is Daddy smiling and playing hide and seek? Maybe things aren’t as bad as I thought.

If your kids believe that you find “boredom” intolerable, they will complain that they are bored, especially if your discomfort with their unhappiness will yield time with the iPad or video games.

And if you demonstrate faith in their ability to entertain themselves, they will. Yes, they may whine and gripe for a few days, but if you stay the course, they will eventually head outside on their bicycles or set up the Monopoly board.

Still, there will be a period of time during which they will (understandably) poke and prod at you to see if you might change your mind and switch on the devices. If you can find a way to be okay with their boredom, they will, too.

Acknowledge that they wish they had unlimited access to their video games, but let go of needing them to be skip the part where they have to adjust to less stimulating summer days. Eventually, they will settle in and find joy in life’s simple pleasures.

Susan Stiffelman is the author of Parenting Without Power Struggles: Raising Joyful, Resilient Kids While Staying Cool, Calm and Connected and the brand new Parenting with Presence: Practices for Raising Conscious, Confident, Caring Kids (An Eckhart Tolle Edition). She is a family therapist, parent coach and internationally recognized speaker on all subjects related to children, teens and parenting.

To learn more about her online parenting courses, classes and personal coaching support, visit her Facebook page or sign up for her free newsletter.

Do you have a question for the Parent Coach? Send it to [email protected] and you could be featured in an upcoming blog post. — This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
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25 Photos That Show The Special Bond Between A Bride And Her Besties

When you’re a kid, you exchange friendship bracelets with your best pals. When you’re an adult, you ask those people ― sisters, cousins, friends and roommates ― to be your bridesmaids.
Below, 25 photos that capture that sweet and silly bond between brides and their besties. 
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